Eco Products That Are Tax Deductible

Eco Products That Are Tax Deductible

If you are wondering if eco products are tax deductible, maybe this will help you.

There are plenty of things that can help you save money if you go green. In 2011 you could write off home energy efficiency improvements. The tax credit was for 10 percent of how much you paid for the equipment and it could be up to $500 for asphalt or new metal roofs, energy efficient doors, retrofits that seal home air leaks, and skylights. For those who purchase a plug in hybrid or electric vehicle you could get a tax break. Also in 2011, if you purchased a Chevy Volt or Nissan LEAF you could’ve gotten a $7,500 tax credit.

Even if you did not make any purchases that were eco-friendly last year, you could’ve received deductions for donations you made to company’s like Goodwill or The Nature Conservancy. You can do this by keeping the donation receipt that the company gave to you. For instructions on filing for a tax credit or deduction you should look through the Internal Revenue Service’s guide to charitable contributions.

Nissan Leaf at the 2009 Tokyo Motor Show (LHD).
Nissan Leaf at the 2009 Tokyo Motor Show (LHD). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

As for some of the things not covered by federal tax credit are: ceiling fans, dehumidifiers, ovens and ranges, refrigerators, toilets, window treatments, whole house fans, compact fluorescent light bulbs, light fixtures, programmable thermostats, and clothes washers and dryers.

So if you are interested in saving money this next tax season on eco-friendly products that you purchased, check the guidelines on the IRS website.

H&R Block Faces Opposition Over The Acquisition Of TaxACT: Federal Antitrust Suit Filed.

While most people are focused on their 2010 tax returns, there is tension in the market. An antitrust lawsuit was filed on Monday by the U.S. Department of Justice in a move to prevent the acquisition of TaxACT by H&R Block. Talk of the $287.5 million deal has led to fears of increased costs and an obstruction of improvements in the market without a third major player to drive competition.

H&R Block

These fears surfaced after H&R Block (Kansas City) revealed its intention in October to merge TaxACT and H&R Block AT Home, creating a division that would be headed by the team from TaxACT.

The Antitrust Division’s assistant attorney general, Christine Varney, issued a release charging that the deal would result in millions of citizens being charged higher costs for digital tax products classified as “do-it-yourself”. Varney further argued that the merger would wipe out advancements made in areas such as free federal filling which is currently a strong suit for TaxACT.

Requests for a response to Varney’s assertions  were not immediately met by H&R Block .

In his contribution to the debate, former H&R block CEO Alan Bennett argued that H&R Block would continue offering free filing for most basic federal returns. He further added that on the one hand this was good since the model is cost effective, efficient and  useful however, the approach is ultimately geared towards getting users of the simple free software to  pay for more complex filing.

Citing that 90 percent of the tax market is currently controlled by H&R Block, TaxACT and Intuit, Varney stressed that permitting the merger would phase out the aggressive competition between the two companies leaving Intuit as the only other large competitor.

Top Ten Tax Tips for Early January

Top Ten Tax Tips for Early January 2010

The IRS has released their first tax tip of the season with the Top Ten Tax Time Tips. Their tips range from record gathering and filing options to Publication 17 review and contacting the IRS with your questions.

1. Get your records ready. Start gathering all the records you will need to prepare your tax return when all tax forms have arrived in the mail.

2. Watch the mailbox. Keep your eyes open for tax documents in the mail including mortgage interest and W2s from your employer. Some mortgage companies do not … Read the rest

Top Ten Tax Tips for Early January 2010

The IRS has released their first tax tip of the season with the Top Ten Tax Time Tips. Their tips range from record gathering and filing options to Publication 17 review and contacting the IRS with your questions.

1. Get your records ready. Start gathering all the records you will need to prepare your tax return when all tax forms have arrived in the mail.

2. Watch the mailbox. Keep your eyes open for tax documents in the mail including mortgage interest and W2s from your employer. Some mortgage companies do not send the forms separately but enclose them with your monthly statement.

3. eFile When Complete. File your return electronically when it is prepared. The majority of Americans are now filing their returns electronically and the process is much faster than the traditional method of mailing in a paper return.

4. Free File your Return. Many preparation software solutions have teamed up with the IRS to provide free filing options when your income is below certain levels. If you use TurboTax or TaxAct, try the free Federal version before paying for the service.

5. Consider Free Consultations. Many parts of the country now offer free filing consultations. Check with your local library or your local community center to see if they have experienced help for you tax preparation.

6. Direct Deposit is Faster. You can speed up your refund from the IRS if you have them directly deposit the funds into a bank account instead of sending you a check.

7. Watch IRS.gov. The government website has updates throughout the tax season with great advice when you need your questions answered.

8. Publication 17. This IRS document is the end all when it comes to information about your tax return. Check it for changes to the tax code that will affect your return in 2010.

9. Review your return. Mistakes and missing information are common when you send a return without it reviewing it first. Take your time to consider every part of your return for additional deductions and credits your might be eligible for.

10. Contact the IRS. If you have a question to hesitate to call 1-800-829-1040 toll free.