Must I File a Tax Return?

Must I File a Tax Return for 2009?

The short answer to this question, do I have to file a tax return, is yes if your income is above the level required for your filing status. But a couple additional pieces of information affect the answer including your age and the source of your income. IRS.gov is a great resource for the exact tax rules.

In addition to the requirement, it makes sense to file a return to get a refund on any taxes that you did pay during the year. There is the special tax credit, Making Work … Read the rest

Must I File a Tax Return for 2009?

The short answer to this question, do I have to file a tax return, is yes if your income is above the level required for your filing status. But a couple additional pieces of information affect the answer including your age and the source of your income. IRS.gov is a great resource for the exact tax rules.

In addition to the requirement, it makes sense to file a return to get a refund on any taxes that you did pay during the year. There is the special tax credit, Making Work Pay, that is refundable to you even if you do not meet the income requirements to file. A government pension could provide you with a tax credit that will be refunded to you. The Earned Income Tax Credit will also refund money to you beyond what you have paid into the tax system. And there are a number of other tax credits that you might qualify for that you can receive a refund on without having earned enough to file.

Now, if you were self-employed during 2009 and earned over $400, you must file a return regardless of other factors. If you owe special taxes on retirement plans or medical savings accounts, you must file a return for 2009. If you work for tips and need to pay social security and Medicare tax, you need to file. If you need to pay the Alternative Minimum Tax or any recapture tax, you need to file a return. And finally, if you work for a church and your income is greater that $108.28.

Top Ten Tax Tips for Early January

Top Ten Tax Tips for Early January 2010

The IRS has released their first tax tip of the season with the Top Ten Tax Time Tips. Their tips range from record gathering and filing options to Publication 17 review and contacting the IRS with your questions.

1. Get your records ready. Start gathering all the records you will need to prepare your tax return when all tax forms have arrived in the mail.

2. Watch the mailbox. Keep your eyes open for tax documents in the mail including mortgage interest and W2s from your employer. Some mortgage companies do not … Read the rest

Top Ten Tax Tips for Early January 2010

The IRS has released their first tax tip of the season with the Top Ten Tax Time Tips. Their tips range from record gathering and filing options to Publication 17 review and contacting the IRS with your questions.

1. Get your records ready. Start gathering all the records you will need to prepare your tax return when all tax forms have arrived in the mail.

2. Watch the mailbox. Keep your eyes open for tax documents in the mail including mortgage interest and W2s from your employer. Some mortgage companies do not send the forms separately but enclose them with your monthly statement.

3. eFile When Complete. File your return electronically when it is prepared. The majority of Americans are now filing their returns electronically and the process is much faster than the traditional method of mailing in a paper return.

4. Free File your Return. Many preparation software solutions have teamed up with the IRS to provide free filing options when your income is below certain levels. If you use TurboTax or TaxAct, try the free Federal version before paying for the service.

5. Consider Free Consultations. Many parts of the country now offer free filing consultations. Check with your local library or your local community center to see if they have experienced help for you tax preparation.

6. Direct Deposit is Faster. You can speed up your refund from the IRS if you have them directly deposit the funds into a bank account instead of sending you a check.

7. Watch IRS.gov. The government website has updates throughout the tax season with great advice when you need your questions answered.

8. Publication 17. This IRS document is the end all when it comes to information about your tax return. Check it for changes to the tax code that will affect your return in 2010.

9. Review your return. Mistakes and missing information are common when you send a return without it reviewing it first. Take your time to consider every part of your return for additional deductions and credits your might be eligible for.

10. Contact the IRS. If you have a question to hesitate to call 1-800-829-1040 toll free.